The fat-burning setting on a workout machine is designed to be less intense than other cardio programs. Carbohydrates are low-hanging fruit when your body is looking for energy, while fat is a bit tougher for your body to use. When you go slow and steady with your workouts, your body isn’t so desperate for quick energy, so you do burn a higher ratio of fat than you would going all-out on the cardio machine.
It’s not just about weight loss. Having great gut health is linked to good health throughout your body. Scientists in this rapidly growing field are finding connections between gut microbes and the immune system, weight loss, gastrointestinal health, , allergies, asthma, and even cancer. With every study that’s published, scientists become more convinced that having a healthy gut leads to having a healthy body.
A study that appeared in the Journal of Research in Medical Sciences showed that drinking green tea consistently leads to weight loss. Researchers examined 63 individuals who were divided into three groups—a control group and two experimental groups. The study spanned a period of 2 months. One experimental group consumed 2 cups of green tea per day while the other group consumed 4 cups of green tea per day. Results showed that the group with the highest level of green tea consumption lost the most weight.
In that study, the researchers looked at the results of previous studies on green tea and weight loss. They found that while some earlier studies found green tea helped people lose about half a pound to 8 pounds more than those who didn't drink green tea, most of studies found no significant difference in weight loss. So while green tea deserves a place in your weight loss diet, simply drinking the tea won't burn fat.

"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."

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