Diet is a major part of the equation, but you can also lower your belly fat with a strategic workout plan. Since you can’t reduce fat in one area, you’ll have to focus on a full-body burn. The good news? That means you’ll be trim and lean all over, not just your mid-section. To torch fat, holistic nutritionist and certified personal trainer Ashley Walter recommends weight training and fasted exercise.
The notion that abdominal obesity is the most dangerous kind isn't new. Back in the 1940s, the French physician Jean Vague observed that some obese patients had normal blood chemistry, while some moderately overweight patients showed serious abnormalities that predisposed them to heart disease or diabetes. Almost always, the latter patients carried their fat around their middles. And, almost always, they were men.
No matter how many crunches you do or how long you hold a plank, you can't spot-reduce belly fat. Sorry! It's one of those unfortunate universal truths, like how eating spicy foods won't speed up your metabolism and doing a juice cleanse won't "detox" your body. But you can make an effort to reduce belly fat if that's the area you are looking to lose weight from — you just have to be strategic about it.
According to Dr. William Davis, a Wisconsin-based “preventative cardiologist”, one food to avoid for the flattest abdomen is wheat. In fact, he attributes the obesity epidemic almost entirely to modern wheat products (they increase blood sugar more than any other food among other things). It’s a tough ask for some, but findings point to promising results. His book, “Wheat Belly,” details his work and how to go about eliminating the starchy culprit from your diet.

Plus, a 2015 study from the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that for those who have a hard time following a strict diet, simplifying the weight loss approach by just increasing fiber intake can still lead to weight loss. Women should aim for at least 25 grams of fiber per day (based on a 2,000-calorie) diet, according to the most recent U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Not sure where to start? Check out our step-by-step guide to increasing your fiber intake.

"Crash diets (dramatically cutting down how much you eat) might help you to lose a few pounds at first, but they’re hard to sustain and won’t help you keep the weight off. It might seem like a quick and easy option, but eating too few calories can actually do more harm than good. If your calorie intake dips too low, your body could go into starvation mode. This will slow down your metabolism, making it harder for your body to lose weight. Make sensible, healthy changes to your lifestyle that you can stick to and avoid the fad diets."
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