New Delhi: Most of us know that herbal teas are good for health. They are loaded with antioxidants and other properties that promote overall health and lower your risk of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, etc. Drinking tea helps boost your metabolism and detoxifies your system. Studies have found that consuming tea, particularly green tea, may improve weight loss and help fight belly fat.
TABLE OF CONTENTS: Introduction: The Gut Health Opportunity Part One: The Amazing World Inside Your Gut Chapter 1: Meet the Microbes Chapter 2: Why the Microbiome Matters Chapter 3: Weight, Belly Fat, and Your Gut: How They're Connected Chapter 4: How Your Microbiome Affects Your Family. Chapter 5: Better Gut Health, Less Disease Chapter 6: Healthy (and Young) from the Inside Out Chapter 7: Repairing a Damaged Gut Part Two: Foods that Feed Your Gut Chapter 8: The Food Your Little Buddies Love Most: Fiber Chapter 9: Don't Give Up on Grains Chapter 10: The Best Things You Can Eat: Fruits and Vegetables Chapter 11: Microbes' Favorite Protein: Legumes Chapter 12: Another Fabulous Fiber Source: Nuts and Seeds Chapter 13: Microbes to Go: Fermented Foods and Live-Culture Foods Part Three: Foods that Harm Your Gut Chapter 14: Foods Raised with Antibiotics, Pesticides, and Other Microbe Killers Chapter 15: Food for the Enemy: Sugar and Refined Carbohydrates Chapter 16: Too Much Low-Quality, Processed Meat Part Four: Other Ways to Boost Gut Health Chapter 17: Avoid Unnecessary Antibiotics Chapter 18: Love Your Gut with Pro-Gut Lifestyle Changes Chapter 19: Let's Talk About Probiotic Supplements Chapter 20: Get Dirtier Part Five: The Super-G Diet, Super-G Meal Plans, and Super-G Recipes

According to a 2015 Journal of Food Biochemistry study, foeniculum vulgare–better known as fennel–has major inflammation-fighting properties. Fans of the mild, sweet licorice-flavored tea have long used it to treat gas and other gastrointestinal issues, too. While the U.S. National Institutes of Health has no stance on fennel's medicinal effectiveness, Germany's Commission E, an official government agency similar to the FDA that focuses on herbs, says that the plant can indeed be an effective flatulence fighter.


A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition examined the anti-obesity effects of tea flavones. The study analyzed 4,280 men over a 14-year period. The researchers focused on 6 specific catechins and 3 flavones during the study period. The study was also adjusted for factors including type 2 diabetes, smoking status, and lifestyle. After the adjustment, researchers found that increased flavone intake resulted in healthier BMIs. The improvements were seen mainly in the female participants.
Consuming bilberries, a northern European cousin to the blueberry, may help reduce bloat-inducing inflammation, according to a study published in the journal *Molecular Nutrition & Food Research*. To come to these findings, researchers divided participants into two groups; one group was given a diet that included an equivalent of 1.5 cups of blueberries, while the other group followed a control diet that didn’t include the fruit. At the end of the experiment, the bilberry-eating group had significantly less inflammation than their counterparts who didn’t munch on the berry. Since the fruit is native to Northern Europe, it isn’t widely available in the US. To reap the benefits, enjoy a few cups of bilberry tea.
Dr. Travis Stork is an Emmy(R)-nominated co-host of the award-winning talk show "The Doctors" and a practicing board-certified emergency medicine physician. He graduated magna cum laude from Duke University and earned his M.D. with honors from the University of Virginia, where he was elected into the prestigious honor society of Alpha Omega Alpha for outstanding academic achievement. Born and rais ...more
Grains get a bad rap when it comes to weight loss, but that's because refined grains (read: processed foods!) are linked to wider waists. 100% whole grains are bloat-busting superstars, however, as they're packed with minerals and de-puff by counter-balancing salt. Stick to brown rice, quinoa, wheat, barley, millet, farro, sorghum, and amaranth for the biggest benefits.
Jessica Rose yes the author considers coffee to be a good belly microbe, and is therefore okay in a diet as long as it is less than 32 oz daily. He also added that…moreyes the author considers coffee to be a good belly microbe, and is therefore okay in a diet as long as it is less than 32 oz daily. He also added that tea and wine are acceptable in moderation since they are plant derivatives. (less)
Ultimately, you need to pick a healthy eating plan you can stick to, Stewart says. The benefit of a low-carb approach is that it simply involves learning better food choices—no calorie-counting is necessary. In general, a low-carb way of eating shifts your intake away from problem foods—those high in carbs and sugar and without much fiber, like bread, bagels and sodas—and toward high-fiber or high-protein choices, like vegetables, beans and healthy meats.
Allow us to throw a wrench in all this weight-loss talk: The evidence of its health benefits isn’t as cut and dry as you’ve been told. A controversial 2013 meta-analysis of almost 100 studies concluded that obesity is linked with all-cause mortality—but overweightness isn’t. Throw in the fact that about 80 percent of dieters will regain the weight, and it’s easy to see why health experts are turning from the calorie-counting approach to a focus on general wellness.
The biggest reason we can’t stick to our workouts? No time. Trying to squeeze a trip to the gym, with a shower and change of clothes, into a hectic schedule—especially around the holidays—can make even the most dedicated fitness buff into someone, well, less buff. But scientists in New Zealand recently found that men and women who engaged in three 10-minute exercise “hors d’oeuvres” before breakfast, lunch and dinner saw lowered blood glucose levels—a fat-busting benefit these folks showed all day long!
According to Dr. William Davis, a Wisconsin-based “preventative cardiologist”, one food to avoid for the flattest abdomen is wheat. In fact, he attributes the obesity epidemic almost entirely to modern wheat products (they increase blood sugar more than any other food among other things). It’s a tough ask for some, but findings point to promising results. His book, “Wheat Belly,” details his work and how to go about eliminating the starchy culprit from your diet.
While you may have an easier time losing belly fat than fat from other parts of your body, when it comes to weight loss, no food or exercise is going to help you lose it from just one area. During weight loss, you burn fat for energy from all parts of your body, not just your belly, according to Yale Scientific. White tea can boost your metabolism a bit for weight loss, but it won't help you lose it specifically from your belly.
In that study, the researchers looked at the results of previous studies on green tea and weight loss. They found that while some earlier studies found green tea helped people lose about half a pound to 8 pounds more than those who didn't drink green tea, most of studies found no significant difference in weight loss. So while green tea deserves a place in your weight loss diet, simply drinking the tea won't burn fat.
Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body can't digest, and it helps regulate the body's use of sugar as it slowly passes through your digestive system. Increasing your daily fiber intake can result in greater satisfaction after meals, less blood-sugar spiking and crashing, and subsequent reductions in the amount of calories eaten for the rest of the day. When trying to trim belly fat, aim to get at least 25 grams of fiber in your diet each day. Foods that are rich in fiber include pulses, like lentils and beans; apples and pears, with the skin; nuts and seeds; and cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Try this recipe for Tabbouleh with Chickpeas for a fiber-packed side dish or a one-dish dinner!

Certain carbohydrates have a tendency to be poorly absorbed in your intestines and then rapidly fermented, leading to gas and bloating. Common culprits include refined carbohydrates and simple sugars—like those found in processed foods with added sugars. Excess sodium can also cause bloating due to increased water retention. Opt for freshly prepared foods and reduce processed, packaged foods to cut back on belly bloaters. In the morning, swap your sugar-laden bowl of cereal for this Green Smoothie, made with fresh fruits and vegetables to get your day started the right way.


"Your body needs a healthy balance of exercise and rest. Doing too much prevents the body from shifting excess fat. Exercising without rest can impact our levels of the steroid hormone cortisol and cause an increase of stubborn fat stored in the belly. Not allowing your body to recover can increase the risk of injury too, so make sure you factor in rest days to your plan."
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