On the surface, exercising for weight loss makes total sense: Burn more calories, and you’ll shed more fat. If only it were that simple. A group of 439 overweight and obese women started dieting, exercising, or both dieting and exercising, or they made no lifestyle changes. By the end of the study, just 3 percent of the exercise-only group reached their target weight-loss goals. In comparison, 42 percent of the dieters and 60 percent of those who’d dieted and exercised hit their goals. The results weren’t surprising. It’s all too easy to gobble up 800 calories in a single sitting, but working off that many calories off at the gym is another story.
Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter belly. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.

Green peppers and other members of the domesticated plant species Capsicum annuum are versatile vegetables that can be included in your daily diet as part of a healthy eating plan. They are low in calories and exceptionally rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They are also a decent source of fibre. Add peppers to your diet to boost your metabolism, which can lead to belly fat loss.
"If your diet consists of lots of sports drinks, sugar-sweetened drinks like fizzy pop and flavoured waters, or sugary foods like chocolate and cakes, it will make losing weight harder. While whole fruits and vegetables are undoubtedly good for you, they can also sometimes cause weight gain if you eat too much, as they have high levels of natural sugars in them. Low-fat food options might have high amounts of added sugar in there too, so make sure to check the food label.
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